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Rock The Bike

9-Foot Cam Straps

Status: in stock
Rentable: no
In The Box:
One pair of 9′ long, 1″ wide cam straps, with steel cam buckle.

Price: $16.00

Highlights from 2010 Earth Hour community party

Thanks to the fans, roadies, bands, Market Bar, and the city’s Neighborhood Empowerment Network.

4 people on El Arbol!

El Arbol had its Pedal Powered Stage debut. My cousins were crawling all over it. Here my 220 pound cousin Jonah and a girl pedal power stereo right while two other girls play on other parts of the tree.

Gear haul mission.

Five of us handled the late afternoon gear haul mission. Jeff and Geoff high fiving on 3rd. It was a pretty easy haul. No real hills.

Hauled the pedalometer on El Arbol.

Hauled the pedalometer on a newly fiberglassed El Arbol.

Just

Roadie and bandleader Justin Ancheta’s helped me with the flberglassing alot over the past week so that the Arbol would be in shape for the gig.

Stopped to pick up the band's gear.

Loading up Guella’s gear at Audio Box studio.

Rock The Bike roadies and Guella's lead singer on the way to the gig.
Rock The Bike roadies Kai, Geoff and Jeff, and Guella’s lead singer Dave on the way to the gig.

Setting up the gig at Market Bar.

Setting up the gig at Market Bar. Photo: Kai.

Guella rocking out.

Guella rocking out under pedal power. Two of our best generators, the Electric Mundo and the Electric Fender Blender Pro (at stage left) powered all of the band’s instruments, the mixer, one JBL PRX, and lighting.

Big Todo puppeteers.

Big ToDo puppeteers treated us to a bike rap!

Late night gear return mission.

Late night gear return mission. Aufdencamp surfs in the distance as Leif tows two Fender Blender Pros behind a Mundo.

Thanks Urban School!

We had a blast last night at the Urban School, pedal powering their first dance of 2010. Thanks to Lucy, Lucas, Catherine and all the students and teachers.

As with any Rock The Bike event, we invite people at the event to pedal. The kid in the foreground is pedaling the Choprical Fish, which is powering the lighting at the dance.

Justin’s pedaling the Mundo 1000 during the sound check, one of our two bikes equipped with our Grasshopper generator system.

 

Despite their abundance of energy for gogo dancing and freaking, the Urban School students were a bit hesitant about joining in the pedal power effort. I felt good that we had shown up with a 6 person crew, including Adam, Masha, Hugh, Justin, and Ally.  But we were doing 90% of the pedaling. Normally, the GP (general public) does more like 40-50% of the pedaling. I tried pulling students in and there were a few cool students who kept pitching. But honestly the freaking on the dance floor was so prolific, that it was obvious that’s where their minds were. So after a while, I stopped walking out into the crowd using a Down Low Glow like an airport landing guide, and just pedaled. I thought back to David Butcher and how he holds it down at festivals, pedaling away on the Prime Mover. I found new time trial position I liked on the Fender Blender Pro, and entered a crank, sprint, lactic acid! cycle. Out of saddle sprint! Lactic acid. Two students get on, both girls. I adjust the seat for one of them and the indicator on our inverter already drops into the red.

 

“Pedal hard! Go for it. ”

 

I look around for crew and don’t see any one. The LED is floating in the red, occasionally hitting blinking red. I know I’m going to need to save this party. I hate having to be intense with the pedal power coaching, but I was yelling, “Pedal, Pedal, Pedal!” every time I saw that blinking light. I was trying to get in a hamstring stretch, but I kept having to coach the girls on the bikes. And my communication with the DJ wasn’t to the point where I could make eye contact with him. He was killing it anyway, and I liked the fact that we were driving the PRX hard. Screw the stretch. I tap out with one of the girl and go into another sprint on the FB Pro.

 

Justin’s back! The other girl taps out and we bring the LED back to orange, and green. It was kind of like that all night. Three electrics would have helped, but really we just needed more from the students. I think some type of introduction would have helped. The students probably didn’t know what the function of the pedal power bikes was, other than to climb all over them and have a blast. No, they knew, but the hormones were too strong. Freaking trumped!

 

Rock The Bike has left the building.

 

We only brought one of our PRX speakers this time. The other is in the shop on a pedal power integration project.

 

See more photos from the night on Flickr.

How to surf a Mundo

Here’s a very clear demonstration of the technique.

See how the calf muscle hooks the front of the saddle? That’s how you control the bike. The rear foot plants forward of the axle.

Pastana Surfs Valencia as Rock The Bike crew roll from Bike Expo to nighttime gig at Baobab.

Of the three in our crew that can surf Mundos only Adam Pastana has the sense of foundation that allows him to dance while surfing. We were on our way from the SF Bike Expo to power the Genie and yours truly at Baobab Village last night.

My parents have told me to take this off our homepage and focus on selling the Down Low Glow.

I think it’s rolling street theater and an absolutely stunning breakthrough in rocking the bike (lowercase). It’s inspiring to me, so I hope that, despite the obvious safety considerations, it’s inspiring on some level, to you too.

Besides that, this brief video shows three of our most important products in action: firstly the Mundo, which we already knew was stiff as a tree trunk and danceably strong, is apparently a great handling surfing bike too. A bike this rigid and predictable is going to be reassuringly stable when you carrying a passenger or a serious load.

Adam’s not only surfing the Mundo, he’s also carrying 30 pounds on one side of the bike in a GoGetter bag while towing a 75 pound Electric Fender Blender Pro from one event to another. Two other bikers pass on the right, with the Down Low Glow providing excellent Side Visibility; one is towing a racing bike on a Mundo.

So you see, it’s not just a video, it’s how we put our gear to the test, week in, week out. If you want to buy your bike products from some place where they all drive to work and click the mouse all day, go right ahead. But if you’re looking for people who ride, who push the envelope, who break and fix things, people you can trust with gear recommendations, you’ve found the right place.

Welcome to Rock The Bike.

Yuba’s new V3 Mundo is here, offering numerous parts upgrades and usability improvements

Yuba releases its all-new V3 Mundo Cargo Bike, with numerous upgrades and usability improvements, making this already beloved bike a true tool for mobility, fitness, and community. Stylish, tough, and highly customizeable, the V3 Mundo stands at the ready for all sorts of missions. The new 21-speed drivetrain and the impressive weight savings — 9 pounds lighter than the original V1 Mundo — mean more riders can enjoy a true cargo bike, in more terrains, with no sacrifice in the Mundo’s legendary stiff ride quality.

 

Above: 36-spoke front and 48-spoke rear wheels with sealed-bearing hubs mean fewer popped spokes and a stable ride when carrying passengers and heavy cargo.

With a max payload of 440 lbs, the Mundo is still the heavyweight of the long-wheelbase cargo bike world. Riders have raved about the predictability and surefootedness of the frame, which become all the more apparent when the bike is loaded down. The 48-spoke tandem-strength rear wheel with its new sealed bearing hub and oversized axle, is a big part of why the Mundo feels so stable when hauling loads.

Above: 4 strap guides keep straps from slipping, and 24 threaded customization points make it easy
to mount running boards, locking equipment cases, custom equipment racks, and Mundo accessories.

The chassis-style loading system has evolved, with welded strap guides, ensuring your straps won’t slip from road vibration. The Mundo is now easier to customize to your unique cargo applications. Threaded braze-on points positioned throughout the cargo rack allow customers and businesses to integrate specific cargo racks, signage, tools, etc. Yuba’s huge and water-resistant GoGetter Bag is a great way to carry smaller and softer loads like food.


Rock The Bike uses Mundos to haul music equipment to their Pedal Powered Stage events.
For many people a Mundo is the “most comfortable bike I’ve ever ridden”. The long wheelbase makes handling easy and predictable, and puts road shock further from the spine of the rider. The Mundo’s upright riding position gives the visibility riders need to steer, signal, and pedal effectively through traffic. The rider’s weight is evenly distributed between the drive wheel and the steering wheel, making quick accelerations and maneuvers safe and decisive. All this comfort, safety, and control gives riders a chance to relax, breathe, and begin to integrate physical fitness with everyday tasks: dropping the kids off to school, picking up supplies for the home, and doing deliveries for a small business.

 


Above: Yuba’s Peanut Shell childseat installed on the rear rack. There’s still room for picnic supplies or a second child seat.
Families will appreciate that the new Mundo’s rack accomodates up to two standard child seats. Yuba’s new Peanut Shell is the simplest choice, as the mounting hardware have been chosen to match the rack.

Adam dropping his girls of to school with a Mundo in San Francisco.

Bigger kids can sit directly on Yuba’s top deck, and rest their feet on the bags or the Side Loaders. The Mundo’s new customization points make it easy to add full-length running boards to the Side Loaders for a stylish and secure footrest. And as the kids grow up, they’ll be able to ride the same bike mom and dad used to drop them at school. The Mundo’s low standover height and long seatpost accomodate riders from around 5′ to 6’3″, and the adjustable stem can be positioned to give the desired room in the front.

For mixed terrain, the Mundo now comes stock with a 21-speed drivetrain, including Shimano Acera front and rear derailleurs, Shimano shifters, and lightweight forged alloy cranks. The frame accomodates fat tires, up to 2.75″, meaning that riders with potholed or offroad routes can get the suspension and control they need. For those in wet climates, the stock fenders and disc brake tabs will enable them to get the best performance in the rain. The standard V-brakes have gotten many positive reviews from Mundo customers.


The welded and reinforced rear rack offers chassis style loading for rigid objects like equipment cases.
Previous generations of Mundos had a bolt-on rear rack.

Bike shops and home mechanics who assemble the new Mundo will love the simplicity of assembly. The all-welded cargo system and full-size carton means the build is now well under an hour, with most key parts (derailleurs, brakes, cranks) installed at the factory and in need of only minor tuning.

The V3 Mundo starts at $1099, and includes fenders and a sturdy side kickstand. Most customers will add the $115 GoGetter bag, and a $16 pair of cam straps. A cargo-strength center-stand will be available in early 2010.

Thanks Fair Oaks St. and the Yes Men! for too much fun in San Francisco Halloween weekend.


Late night Haunted Hay Ride on the Biker Bar, cruising down 18th from the Castro to the District, with five European tourists along for the ride.


Rockin’ Halloween colors on our way to Fair Oaks St. with a Masked Masha rolling a Mundo with the Down Low Glow. At sunset, yeow!

Whoah. Amazing weekend. So much gratitude to the crew, the people of Fair Oaks St., and the Yes Men!


Kai and Pastana showed up Saturday afternoon to help mod the Biker Bar into a Haunted Hay Ride.


Tara had texted me earlier to “try 6th and Bryant as a source for $15 hay bales.” Then on the way there I realized she was sending me to the wholesale flower market. Thanks for the tip, T! I pulled in and immediately saw a bale in a stall. One cam strap on the Mundo. Back to the house.


We reduced the hay to useful cushion sizes and cam strapped Kai’s birdcage to the Biker Bar.


Kai bringing Pooh into the mix.

Do you wanna go on a Haunted Hay Ride? Yes I wanna go on a Haunted Hay Ride? Do you wanna go on a Haunted Hay Ride? Yes I wanna go on a Haunted Hay Ride?  When you wanna to go on a Haunted Hay Ride? Hmm, I dunno, how about now?


We kept the dancing going for the big kids for another couple hours.

Sunday Afternoon. Do it again.


Heading to the San Francisco debut of the Yes Men’s touching and hilarious “The Yes Men Fix The World”


Adam practicing one of the building block skills for no-hands surfing.


The lucky recipients of three $4 million Survivaballs.


Escorting the Survivaballs from the Roxie to the closest Chevron.


The Yes Men used the march as an opportunity to tout the
benefits of the Survivaball. Rock The Bike supplied the mobile P/A and
later the Pedal Powered Stage for the rally.


We turned up the dance music, including an exhuberant “I Will Survive.”


After the Chevron protest, we kept the afterparty going.
The Mundo 1000 has been holding it down as our most efficient pedal power bike.

If you’ve read this far and you’re local, you’ll probably want to join our SF Cruisers email list, and come out Monday night to Dia De Los Muertos with the Rock The Bike crew.

Thanks Sunday Streets fans and crew!

Rock The Bike pumping up the Mission District for Sunday Streets. by you.
Morning ride: Crew pumping up the District for Sunday Streets.

Sunday Streets (near the beach), August 9, 2009 by Steve Rhodes.

Set up our Pedal Powered Stage on the Great Highway, with dancing on the beach. Photo: Steve Rhodes

Represent.  by you.

First we loaded the Biker Bar with hundreds of pounds of audio gear.

Custom V1 Mundo trailer hitch flexed a bit under this extreme load. by you.

The custom V1 Mundo trailer hitch flexed a bit under this extreme load, but basically it was a very controllable ride.

Adam entertains. by you.

Adam entertained in Golden Gate Park on the way to the beach.

Fossil Fool & Rock the Bike perform at Sunday Streets, August 9, 2009 by Steve Rhodes.

We set up a 5-bike Pedal Powered Stage on the Great Highway — two electric Mundos and the Biker Bar.

 

Cousin Ken pitching in on the Biker Bar. by you.

Cousin Ken pitching in on the Biker Bar, with Arie along for the ride.

Fossil Fool & Rock the Bike perform at Sunday Streets, August 9, 2009 by Steve Rhodes.

Fossil Fool, the Bike Rapper, with guests Mafiosa Felice, Terry, and Jared May.

Sunday Streets (near the beach), August 9, 2009 by Steve Rhodes.

The scene from a nearby dune. Photo: Steve Rhodes

Police car going by as Sunday Streets ended by Steve Rhodes.

Cops threatened to shut down Tornado Rider.

So we moved.

IMG_0725 by Steve Rhodes.

IMG_0724 by Steve Rhodes.

And they shredded the venue.

Tornado Rider - Rock the Bike at Sunday Streets, August 9, 2009 by Steve Rhodes.

IMG_0738 by Steve Rhodes.

Hoop Jam with Movement Maker Mei.

All photo montages: Steve Rhodes

This is the 36V 18Ah Sealed Lead Acid rechargeable battery that helps us get up and over the hill from the Mission to the beach.   by you.

This is the 36V 18Ah Sealed Lead Acid rechargeable battery that helps us get up and over the hill from the Mission to the beach.

Ready for gear return mission. by you.

Rolling the 'Long Things' bundle. by you.

Rolling the ‘Long Things’ bundle.

Fully loaded Biker Bar, probably 275 pounds of gear, including bass drum, two JBL PRX535's, and the Fossil Fool tent. by you.

Fully loaded Biker Bar, probably 275 pounds of gear, including bass drum, two JBL PRX535’s, and the Fossil Fool tent.

We made $52 in tips. This is what we did with the money. by you.

We made $52 in tips. Thanks to all the fans who pitched in for Tornado Rider and the Rock The Bike crew. This is what we did with the money.

Down Low Glow (front) and MonkeyLight ambient glow comparison. by you.

Late night gear return mission.

Thanks SF Marathon runners and pedalers

Viv crew hamming it up between awards categories by you.
Rock The Bike brought our Pedal Powered Stage to the finish line of the San Francisco Marathon, where fans, runners, volunteers, and the crew pedal powered the awards ceremony. Above, Viv team volunteers helped us get a groove going between the different award classes.

Medaler Pedaler (with son). by you.

Even marathoners who’d podiumed — note the ribbon around this pedaler’s neck — summoned the energy to power the sound system for the award ceremony. One described it as “Good Recovery”. The two Electric Mundos shown above offer amazing stability, with their Lunar Lander kickstands, and an excellent size range for pedalers of all ages. The runner above was able to get his son pedaling along side him.

Biker Bar loaded after the SF Marathon. by you.

 

Above, arriving at the venue with our gear strapped to the Biker Bar. The wooden cover that protects the pedal power equipment mounted to the aluminum chassis also stiffens the overall structure, making it predictable and safe to ride with hundreds of pounds of gear. Depending on the distances and terrain where you’ll be riding, we recommend using the Mundo 1000, our electric cargo bike. The Mundo 1000 has plenty of pickup to get you up the hills, and its long wheelbase helps you get a stable ride when towing the Biker Bar.

First time dropping a tandem on the Biker Bar by you.

Although few people biked to the event, we were able to get the Biker Bar involved in the Pedal Power effort. This was the first time we had dropped a tandem on the Biker Bar, which couples the output of three bikes mechanically in a cromoly tube. It’s cool to think that the biker bar could actually harness six pedalers’ power!

 

Checking out the Pedalometer by you.

Our six-foot Pedalometer shows fans and pedalers the health of the pedal power system as measured by voltage.

A steady stream of marathoners, including the first place women's finisher, wanted to pedal their own smoothies. by you.

Better than mystery powders, what could be better than a fruit smoothie after a hard run? Luckily the Fender Blender Pro was in effect.

Rolling to the marathon as runners grab water. by you.

Above, our early morning gear run to the event brought us unexpectedly onto the route itself.

Towing FB Pro no handed in FreeLoader bag. by you.

Rolling back from the Marathon. Leif cruising no-handed on the Xtracycle with unclaimed flowers, pulling the Fender Blender Pro in trailer mode.

 

Thanks Central Park! Rock The Bike NYC is alive and kicking.

Rock The Bike NYC

 

Rock The Bike says a huge thank you to Central Park Conservancy for getting us involved in Earth Day 2009, and helping us get Rock The Bike NYC off the ground. Here are some of the highlights from our visit to New York over the past 11 days.

 

Kids Love Spin Art

 

We had a blast meeting the public at Earth Day. Above, Pedal Powered Spin art.

 

 

The Biker Bar

 

We debuted our new multi-person pedal power system, the Biker Bar. Three bikes share a common drive shaft, that turns a powerful generator on the fourth bike, an Electric Mundo (blue bike on the left)

 

The Biker Bar -- Multi-person Pedal Power farm.

 

Unfortunately, in its first outing, the Biker Bar was no match for the power-hungry PA equipment that event organizers supplied. The power consumption of the audio system was approximately 300-400 watts with one person speaking on a microphone, not even any music playing.

 

Ever since we started doing Pedal Powered Stage events, clients and organizers have been asking “Why can’t we use the speakers we already have?” Good question. We commonly answer “Because we use the new generation of digitally powered speakers, and their higher efficiency makes pedal power possible.” But in the process of working with Central Park and other clients, they kept asking… So with Central Park, we accepted the challenge. We put our efforts into making the Biker Bar powerful, simple, and efficient. We told them “Sure, you can.”

 

But on the day of the event their equipment’s power draw was just too much. Suddenly Pedal Power felt really hard. When a chain snapped, we talked with the Central Park team and decided to focus on our other offerings and let their music stage run on wall power. Luckily they had that backup option at the ready. In future events, we definitely plan to have a 30-45 minute battery backup, which will allow us to fix mechanicals or other issues without letting the performers down.

 

Spin Art

Luckily, the Spin Art station and the Bike Blenders were a huge hit.

Paul spinning up the Spin Art as kids look on enthralled.

Kids of all ages were able to make Spin Art and pedal for other kids.

Above, the Tropicalia team making bike blended smoothies.

Sarah on the Mundo

We had bright bikes and big smiles to share with the crowds.

 

Galen ollying.

 

And tricks to share… Above, Sara floating on a Mundo. Galen ollies.

 

 

Travis hauling the Biker Bar

We biked everything back to Brooklyn on a hot afternoon.

Travis piloted the Biker Bar, which becomes a cargo trailer to get gear home from an event. Just add the wheels!

The Electric Mundo helps haul the 250 pound load up and over the Williamsburg Bridge.

 

 

Cruiser ride in Manhattan

 

Rolling down 5th Avenue

 

Above: Rolling back from Central Park with our crew, friends, cousins, and the Choprical Fish.

 

Eden in the pack

 

Getting ready for Central Park was a huge task. We arrived a week ahead of time and only set our tools town to pack for the park at 2AM the night before. Check out the preparations below:

 

Sunset cruise in Brooklyn.

 

 

First things first! How about a social ride to get to know each other.

 

Carrying gear

Leif keeps the beat as Galen and Lopi haul gear across Brooklyn with Mundos and the trailer.

Riding gear through Brooklyn.

We set up a little workshop at Brooklyn’s 3rd Ward.

Below, hand stretching the frame of the Mundo to fit the electric rear wheel.

Leif and Emily stretching the Mundo frame to fit electric rear wheel.

We generated many sparks and generally looked bad ass with our protective eye wear.

Lopi cleaning up the spin art station.

Removing screw heads with grinder.

Olivia cutting frame to get seat tube.

We solved engineering riddles. Above trying to anticipate issues with the drive train of the Spin Art station.

Choprical Fish as getter.

We used the Choprical Fish as transportation bike and ‘getter’.

Above, 75 pounds of Sealed Lead Acid batteries.

Hip hop cipher in SoHo.

Of course having the Fish in New York meant there were a few impromptu street parties and even a cypher around town over the past week.

Above, freestyle session in front of a school in Soho. A teacher came out and said “How about a song about getting back to class?!”

Fossil Fool rapping at 3rd Ward party

Fossil Foolin’ at a 3rd Ward party.

Brooklyn Bike and Board

In our last couple days in town, we picked up a couple cool new Mundo dealers. Above, Brooklyn Bike and Board

 

are your Mundo people in Brooklyn. Map.

Leif delivering a Mundo

Leif delivering Mundos. The same bikes we used to get work done in New York are now for sale and ready to ride at two locations in Manhattan and Brooklyn.

George Bliss picks up the Mundo

And in Manhattan, cargo bike innovator George Bliss picked up the Mundo for The Hub Station in Soho

Many thanks to the Rock The Bike NYC crew for their hard work and excellent hosting.

Welcoming Solano Cyclery, Ken’s Bike & Ski, and The Bicycle Chef to the Rock the Bike

Ever since Interbike we’ve been signing up some great new Dealers. Here’s a small profile of a few of them:

The Bicycle Chef, in Sacramento, CA

The Bicycle Chef in Sacramento, CA

With their recent move to a spacious spot on N Street just outside Downtown Sacramento, The Bicycle Chef has redoubled its commitment to supporting commuters and lifestyle cyclists. Manager Whit told me that they actively support sustainability by encouraging customers to keep and repair old bikes. They make a lot of people smile that way. And it only boosts their reputation when people are rolling around town, psyched that they’ve got that good bike feeling again and all they had to buy was a pair of brakes and new tire. And now they’re going to be the Sacramento joint for Mundo test rides. They’ve got the affordable, bright red single-speed Mundo, perfect for flat cities like Sacramento.

 

Ken’s Bike & Ski:

This is the kind of shop you want to buy a bicycle from. Ken’s is huge in size but still owner-operated, and has been in business for decades. I could tell by the questions Ken was asking about the Mundo as he pondered it over, that this shop that supports every sale with superior service over the life of the bike, not just the first year or the 30-day tuneup. In other words, it means something to buy a bike from Ken’s.

I personally prefer not to test ride bikes in a parking lot, and conveniently, Ken’s is located next to a few good residential blocks where you can pedal hard and test the bike out. They’ve also got the bright red single-speed Mundo in stock.

Solano Cyclery:

Solano Cyclery

Located on Solano Ave. in the Berkeley/Albany area, Solano Cyclery was our host for the street party / Xtracycle rally on Solano Stroll. This fellow Xtracycle dealer has a great reputation for quality service and shop spirit. They picked up the Down Low Glow when they heard about its unique Side Visibility safety benefit. Another cool shop that cares about your safety and style. Definitely worth a visit, and they have the Down Low Glow in stock, which is more than I can say for Rock the Bike at the moment.

Checked Flickr and found we’re not the only ones carrying other bikes on the Mundo.

MundoItalvegaTowTruckP1020664.JPG by macpaulster.

Photo: MacPaulster.

Being able to quickly improvise a towing or carrying rig that gets two bikes across town with one rider is one of the Mundo’s unsung features. This is one of those features that you might read, and say to yourself “I’d never do that.” But then you find yourself in a situation where, you know, it would just come in handy. This is a lifesaver on social rides. If you’re the bike person in your group of friends, you can bring an extra bike to the start of a ride. Or, say someone gets a flat on their front tire, but you’re only a mile from home. Might be simpler just to tow that thing than bust out the patch kit.

towing bike and flowers2 by gregraisman.

Above: Greg from Portland tows a bike and flowers.

IMG_2950 by Jeremy Towsey-French.
The Stumptown Mundo crew Mundo towing a mundo for delivery to a customer.

mundo towing xtracycle
Mundo towing Xtracycle, courtesy: Cycle9

Carrying a stumpjumper to the shop to convert to a blender
Not towing, carrying, in this photo. With the Mundo’s steel chassis as stiff as it is, all you have to do is strap the frame of the silver bike to the Mundo in a couple different places using cam straps. Then I used scraps of cardboard as separators to keep the paint job intact.

By the way it’s a 1983 Stumpjumper. I was bringing it to the shop to convert it to a blender, see the finished product here: www.https://rockthebike.clientsitetest.com/node/1618

IMG_2947 by Jeremy Towsey-French.Stumptown Mundo crew towing a townie.

IMG_2951 by Jeremy Towsey-French.
A closeup of the Stumptown Mundo rig. Two bungees and a U-lock, y’all!

Greg from Flickr carrying his recumbent

Greg from Flickr carrying his recumbent

RTB crew pedal power largest tree planting in FUF’s history, meet Stone Gossard of Pearl Jam, back him up at the Grand Ballroom

Posted by fossilfool
We woke up at 6:30 to bike approximately 8 miles to the FUF tree planting in time by you.
The day started with a 7AM bike ride to the outer sunset for Friends of the Urban Forest’s DigIt event.The Mundo is carrying our new 600 watt JBL PRX535 speaker. Two straps is all it took to secure the 70 pound speaker.
20081018-085027 by alwaysupndown.
Our job was to up the energy of the event with pedal powered music, and allow event organizers to make announcements to approximately 400 volunteers at registration and lunchtime. Timberland sponsored the event, and they’re making a short film about it. Above, the documentary crew wanted an interview. Photo: Aufdencamp.
20081018-124043 by alwaysupndown.
After the initial wave of volunteers went out into the nearby neighborhoods to plant trees, Stone Gossard of the band Pearl Jam checked out the stage and got excited about potentially pedal powering his set at the Grand Ballroom that night. Photo: Aufdencamp.

 

20081018-123412 by alwaysupndown.
Stone and his bandmates picked up the spirit of the pedal power immediately.  Photo: Aufdencamp.
The new human power kickstand for the Mundo performed flawlessly by you.

We used the Mundo to carry gear to the event, and also as one of the three pedal power bikes. The two red tubes elevate the rear wheel of the Mundo and allow you to pedal it in place. A tire-rubbing generator is mounted on the top of the chassis.

20081018-142504 by alwaysupndown.
After the event we rode with our gear to the Grand Ballroom. Photo: Aufdencamp.
20081018-165334 by alwaysupndown.
Set up was fairly straightforward, being our second time of the day. Photo: Aufdencamp.
Pedal Powering Stone Gossard of Pearl Jam by you.
The plan was for the band to play their first song through our Pedal Powered Stage, then switch to the venue’s main speakers.
Changing it up. Pedalers get on an off the generator bikes between songs. by you.
Instead they played their whole first set through our stage. Audience members swapped out on the different bikes during song breaks.
20081018-204254-1 by alwaysupndown.
“Voltage is dropping — Go! Go! Go!” Photo: Aufdencamp.
20081018-203745 by alwaysupndown.
Stone and his band played a great rock set ranging from Hank Williams to a cover of 1999 by Prince. Photo: Aufdencamp.
Below: Play an audio clip of Stone Gossard adlibbing about our Pedal Powered Stage during the nighttime set at the Ballroom.

Sorry, we should have told you sooner, but we’re backordered on our two most popular items

I’m sorry, we really should have told you sooner. Both the Down Low Glow and the 6-Spd Mundo are unfortunately out of stock.

It seems that whenever I tell friends in casual conversations that we’re backordered on the Down Low Glow, they usually congratulate me as if this is somehow great news for Rock the Bike. But I wish we could get all of our current orders out tomorrow. It’s just that we are unfortunately operating on a very limited stock of our rechargeable batteries. More are on the way, but by sea.

On the plus side, a limited by-air shipment will be arriving soon. And we are aiming to fill DLG orders placed now in time for Halloween. We will even offer free shipping to those who place an order before the 14th, if you do not receive your DLG by Halloween (US only offer).

 

 

Mundo Cargo Bike

Mundos are due in early November. The Mundo has simply been selling faster than we have anticipated. We’re fortunate that more Mundos are already on a boat approaching the Panama Canal, but we’re unfortunate that only 75 are on that boat. If you want one before Spring 2009, please order soon so that we can hold yours.

With such critical, mainline items out of stock, you may be wondering, what’s in stock?

Single speed Mundo

The bright red “Ziegelrot” single-speed Mundo. Perfect for flatter terrains. Simple, strong, fun to ride, cheerful. We also have cool upgrades that fit the bright red Single Speed Mundo perfectly, like the yellow and red “Hazarea” Sweetskinz tires seen on our shop Mundo.

For Bay Area folks, please come to our Berkeley Workshop to test-ride and purchase fully-built Single Speed Mundos.

Bike Blenders. Both Fender Blender X and Fender Blender Universale (FBU, formerly B3 Mini) are in stock and shipping. Bike Blenders bring people together around bikes and fruit. What could be better? A great tool for growing the bike movement, teaching kids about healthy eating, and drawing a crowd at festivals.


Xtracycle FreeRadicals (and expert installations for Bay Area folks).

 

 

 

 

 

The Soul Cycle “In The Pocket” Head Unit. Our simplest Mobile Audio System.

 

 

 

 

 

 

And other good stuff like Righteous Kickstands, Incredibells, Sweetskinz, all good stuff.

We are hustling to get the Down Low Glow and Mundo 6-Speeds back in stock. We’ll keep you up to date.

When will my credit card be charged? Orders placed online will have their cards charged at the time of purchase. Orders placed over the phone will have their cards charged within a few days of shipping.

Joel Elrod, LiveOnBike drummer, and an explanation of the LiveOnBike Mundo

Skip ahead to 00:24:

This video gives a taste of the LiveOnBike performances we’ve been doing on SF Cruiser rides this summer. Joel Elrod, who had just finished playing a gig with Pleasuremaker, is drumming on a SPDS electronic drum machine. The signal from the SPDS is carried from the back of the Mundo to the front where it enters a DIT Head Unit containing a Rolls MX56c 4-Channel mixer and Shure Wireless body pack microphone, and DoubleWide Down Low Glow battery that powers the SPDS and a dual tube DLG system for 5 hours.

Skip ahead to 1:15.

The LiveOnBike rig also has a microphone seen in this video of Janaysa performing at the Bicycle Music Festival, but it takes longer to set up, so we haven’t been using it with Joel. The signal of the Shure body pack on the LiveOnBike rig is caught by the receiver on the backrest of the Choprical Fish. I select the tracks from an iPod on the control panel of the Fish. When I pick a new track, Joel listens for a few moments and then picks up the beat and improvises on the playing-card-sized rubber pads of the SPDS.

Both Adam (pilot of the LiveOnBike Mundo) and I have the ability raise and lower the volume level of the SPDS. When I was piloting the bike for Janaysa, I was able to set her vocals and keyboard levels independently using Channel 1 and Channel 2 of the MX56c. We were experiencing a very short range with our wireless transmitter that night, as you can hear in the first moments of the videos.

The DIT Head Unit uses the excellent 1-button KlickFix handlebar mounting system, and the wiring harness simply Velcros to the bike, so we can convert the Mundo from Town Hauler to Rock Star in only 5 minutes, and that includes mounting the SPDS and aTractor seat. I know that’s lot of names for you, but well, that’s how we did it.

Trails and tribulations

well, finding this company was a bit of a god send; I’ve been looking into getting either a Trek 520 Touring, and new 2008 Ralliegh Sojourn (new touring bike w/ disk brakes) or simply a Surley Long Haul Trucker and more than likely adapting an Extra Cycle frame/bags.
Came out of the library 2 days ago, and saw the most interesting bike I’ve seen since the Dutch beer delivery rig crossed my sights, a mtn bike w/ this type of extension BUILT IN! 😀
Then, after getting ahold of a retail shop by the same name (Fraser) I found y’all.
Has anyone tryed to mount a Burley D’Lite or Corsair XT trailer to one of these, and what were the limitations? I wld love to hear back on this.

Aaron, Da Hobo wit’da mojo 😉

Rolling with 88 weighted keys — preparing for a Live On Bike performance

Some interesting scenes from the workshop this week, preparing for BMF. The musical part starts at 3:05. It was awesome to see the expressions on our neighbors’ faces as we cruised around West Berkeley with Janaysa singing and playing.

Folk / Soul singer Janaysa came by the workshop on Tuesday to test-ride the piano mount on the Mundo. She was initially ‘concerned’ but left on a high after a good try out.

Folk/Soul singer Janaysa set to Rock the Bike at Bicycle Music Festival this Saturday!

We had a great practice ride tonight in the neighborhood around our workshop. The aTractor Seat and custom bamboo piano mount were both strong and comfortable, allowing her plenty of leg room. She practiced about 5 songs, giving me time to see how the bike handled. The handling was difficult but manageable. Even the slightest uphill made it noticeably harder to maintain a straight line, because her weight is so far behind the rear axle. The frame was up to the task, but the front end just felt light. I had to really maintain focus and keep my arm muscles tensed at all times.

The sound of her voice and piano playing made it all worth it, though. I’m really excited to bring her unique music to the streets at BMF, live!